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Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society > Volume 47(3); 2010 > Article
Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society 2010;47(3): 228-231.
doi: https://doi.org/10.3340/jkns.2010.47.3.228
Decompressive Surgery in a Patient with Posttraumatic Syringomyelia.
Min Seok Byun, Jun Jae Shin, Yong Soon Hwang, Sang Keun Park
Department of Neurosurgery, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. zunzae@hanmail.net
ABSTRACT
Posttraumatic syringomyelia may result from a variety of inherent conditions and traumatic events, or from some combination of these. Many hypotheses have arisen to explain this complex disorder, but no consensus has emerged. A 28-year-old man presented with progressive lower extremity weakness, spasticity, and decreased sensation below the T4 dermatome five years after an initial trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large, multi-septate syrinx cavity extending from C5 to L1, with a retropulsed bony fragment of L2. We performed an L2 corpectomy, L1-L3 interbody fusion using a mesh cage and screw fixation, and a wide decompression and release of the ventral portion of the spinal cord with an operating microscope. The patient showed complete resolution of his neurological symptoms, including the bilateral leg weakness and dysesthesia. Postoperative MRI confirmed the collapse of the syrinx and restoration of subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. These findings indicate a good correlation between syrinx collapse and symptomatic improvement. This case showed that syringomyelia may develop through obstruction of the subarachnoid CSF space by a bony fracture and kyphotic deformity. Ventral decompression of the obstructed subarachnoid space, with restoration of spinal alignment, effectively treated the spinal canal encroachment and post-traumatic syringomyelia.
Key Words: Syringomyelia; Magnetic resonance imaging; Trauma; Subarachnoid space; Obstruction
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